• My cart
    0.00$
    0
    • Your cart is currently empty.
Store This, Not That! > Blog > Cooking with Food Storage > Tips for Cooking Your Beans
January 6th, 2008

Tips for Cooking Your Beans

Cooking your DRY Beans: Dry beans need to be soaked before they can be cooked.

Quick Soaking – For each pound of beans, add 10 cups hot water; heat to boiling and let boil 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from heat, cover and set aside for at least 1 hour.

Overnight Soak – For each pound (2 cups) dry-packaged beans, add 10 cups cold water, then let soak overnight, or at least 8 hours.

 

Cooking Beans

Once your beans have soaked and tripled in size, it’s time to cook them. The most important step in this process is to drain off the soaking water and rinse the beans before cooking to help decrease the gas side effect. Depending on the bean variety, it will take 30 minutes to 2 hours to cook. Make sure and check the package for more specific directions. You’ll know the beans are done when they are tender, but not overcooked. If your beans have been sitting in your food storage for a long time you will need to cook them for a longer period of time. Cool the beans in their cooking liquid if you are not adding them to another liquid, like a soup, when they are done cooking.

 

Storing Freshly Cooked Beans

Because cooking beans can be a process, you may want to cook more than you need and store them for next time to save you time (and you’re only making one mess!). Store cooked beans tightly covered in the fridge up to 5 days or in the freezer for up to 6 months.

amazing reviews click here

Related posts

26 Comments

  • Linda Clegg

    June 9, 2009 at 3:49 pm

    Hi,

    This is a quick-prep method for dry beans that I have used for years. I do the quick-soak method that you have outlined, then I put them in my pressure cooker at 10 lbs pressure for 10 minutes. This is a life saver if you want to make a bean recipe and you don’t have a lot of time.

    Linda

  • Linda Clegg

    June 9, 2009 at 8:49 am

    Hi,

    This is a quick-prep method for dry beans that I have used for years. I do the quick-soak method that you have outlined, then I put them in my pressure cooker at 10 lbs pressure for 10 minutes. This is a life saver if you want to make a bean recipe and you don’t have a lot of time.

    Linda

  • Gillie

    July 9, 2009 at 5:24 pm

    I’ve heard that adding baking soda to the beans while they soak will decrease the gas effect. Has anyone tried this or had success with another method? My husband knows immediately if there are beans in something πŸ™‚

    • Obergirl

      November 4, 2010 at 4:41 pm

      I have done this in the past. It seems to work. I also now pressure can my beans. I have found that they do not produce any gas when I pressure cook them. I use 1 c. dried beans to a quart and fill to within 5″ from the top. Pressure cook them for 1 hour after it comes to pressure.

  • Gillie

    July 9, 2009 at 10:24 am

    I’ve heard that adding baking soda to the beans while they soak will decrease the gas effect. Has anyone tried this or had success with another method? My husband knows immediately if there are beans in something πŸ™‚

  • Patti

    July 24, 2009 at 1:53 am

    I have tried baking soda in the beans and have not noticed any difference, however, here is a trick I have tried that does seem to work.
    I put the beans in enough water to cover them and place them on the stove over high heat. When they start to boil, drain, add more hot water and repeat. Do this several times. This eliminates the need to soak overnight and it reduces the gas effect.
    Hope it works for you!

  • Patti

    July 23, 2009 at 6:53 pm

    I have tried baking soda in the beans and have not noticed any difference, however, here is a trick I have tried that does seem to work.
    I put the beans in enough water to cover them and place them on the stove over high heat. When they start to boil, drain, add more hot water and repeat. Do this several times. This eliminates the need to soak overnight and it reduces the gas effect.
    Hope it works for you!

  • Sherry

    July 27, 2009 at 12:43 am

    Has anyone tried the product/spice called “epazote” to decrease the gas from beans. I have recently purchased it & was told that many cultures from Central & South America use it in their recipes. It is a spice that adds NO flavor or taste but chemically eliminates that “gassy” side effect! πŸ™‚

    I plan to try it but was wondering if anyone else had already tried it?

  • Sherry

    July 26, 2009 at 5:43 pm

    Has anyone tried the product/spice called “epazote” to decrease the gas from beans. I have recently purchased it & was told that many cultures from Central & South America use it in their recipes. It is a spice that adds NO flavor or taste but chemically eliminates that “gassy” side effect! πŸ™‚

    I plan to try it but was wondering if anyone else had already tried it?

  • Anonymous

    September 8, 2009 at 8:12 pm

    I have learned to put 1/3 cup of millet in with 1 lb of any dry beans while the are cooking. This elimates the gas effect because it completes the amino acids(Proteins) and balances the enzymes in the digestive tract that would cause the gas if not balanced. It is a absolute solution.

  • sampete

    October 22, 2009 at 1:25 pm

    The best way to eliminate gas in beans is to sprout them first. Rinse the dry beans then let them soak overnight in a glass jar of water covering the beans. In the morning drain the water, rinse the beans, drain them again and set the wet beans (still in the jar) aside all day. The beans are not soaking in water anymore they are just wet in the jar. Rinse and drain again in the evening and set them aside. On the second day do the same thing, keeping the beans damp from rinsing and draining in the morning and in the evening (more often if beans look like they are getting dry). Keep doing this (usually three days, so it does take some planning ahead but its worth it) and the beans will begin to sprout. As soon as you notice the tiny sprout emerging from the bean that's when you use them in your recipe. The beans will not take quite as long to cook. If the beans don't sprout they could be old or room temperature is too cold. Place jar of damp beans in a sunny window to aid sprouting, but don't allow them to dry out.

  • tammygraf

    November 17, 2009 at 11:09 pm

    My husband and mother will not eat beans. My husband says they are bad for his gout and they give my mother the runs. I love beans and have beans in my food storage but since I'm the only one that will eat them – what good are they? My question is does anyone know how to make beans less toxic for my mother?

  • kmcollier

    December 6, 2009 at 4:26 pm

    This is a great way to reduce gas and increase their nutrition. When you sprout things it increases their nutrition value by 10-100% which could be a lifesaver if you did not have your vitamins or were missing certain foods. They taste great too!

  • hecfino68

    December 15, 2009 at 1:16 pm

    I would check with your husbands doctor about the beans, because everything that I have learned ab out gout says the opposite. Lowering intake of dietary purines from meat and seafood, consuming adequate vitamin C, limiting alcohol and fructose ingestion, and avoiding obesity have all been shown to be effective in preventing gout.
    Vitamin C in take of 1,500 mg decreases the risk of gout by 45% compared to 250 milligrams per day. Beans should actually be a good food for him. For your mother–try grinding beans into bean flour and putting some into your bread or using it to thicken gravy. Put a couple of tablespoons on a salad–ect. Do small amounts several times a week and see if she reacts the same way. Her body may just take longer to adjust to them.

    • J.W.

      January 22, 2011 at 8:40 pm

      The thing about beans and gout: Beans have a lot of protein. People with gout are supposed to limit high protein foods–including red meat and beans. (this is directly from my husband’s doctor). Losing weight helps with all kinds of health issues–gout, diabetes, heart disease, etc.

  • hecfino68

    December 15, 2009 at 1:23 pm

    You can pressure cook extra and freeze them in freezer bags so you always have beans ready to go.

  • trainagiles

    January 10, 2010 at 3:52 pm

    The best thing to do is to buy a pressure cooker. It takes me only 1 hour to cook dry pinto beans that haven't been soaked at all. It was the best investment in my cooking to save me time and energy. I also use it for brown rice and it only takes me 17 minutes from the time it steams.

  • Helen

    March 19, 2010 at 11:35 am

    What about cooking beans in a pressure cooker? Do the times depend on the type or size of cooker used, or just on the pressure, type of bean, & altitude? I used a pressure cooker for the first time yesterday (non-electric, 4 qt, pressure weight 5/10/15). I tried cooking cannelini (white kidney) beans — the booklet didn't have that bean listed, so I used the time for kidney beans (30 min at 15 lb), plus added 7 minutes for high altitude (5000 ft). The beans were really, really, mushy, so I ended up pureeing them and making brownies. (The red potatoes for mashing turned out great, though — 11 min at 15 lb.)

  • eatfoodstorage

    March 19, 2010 at 1:52 pm

    It does differ. I'd look up times online.

  • Julie

    April 8, 2010 at 1:04 pm

    There is a book called “The Bean Bible” that claims there is no benefit to soaking beans. You can just cook them from dry, adding 2x the amount of water as beans and they are done in 1-2 hours on the stove top. I have tried it and it works!!

    • Rockman X

      November 1, 2012 at 12:48 pm

      There’s a book call The Bible that says a guy named Noah lived to be 900 years, so I’d be wary of anything claiming to be the “Bible” of anything.

  • eatfoodstorage

    April 8, 2010 at 3:20 pm

    The benefit is that it reduces gas to switch the water. So if you have a
    sensitive tummy, there are benefits.

  • Julie

    April 8, 2010 at 8:04 pm

    There is a book called “The Bean Bible” that claims there is no benefit to soaking beans. You can just cook them from dry, adding 2x the amount of water as beans and they are done in 1-2 hours on the stove top. I have tried it and it works!!

  • eatfoodstorage

    April 8, 2010 at 10:20 pm

    The benefit is that it reduces gas to switch the water. So if you have a
    sensitive tummy, there are benefits.

  • Kym

    May 26, 2010 at 7:48 pm

    I have a question on the storing of freshly cooked beans…actually just lots of questions on beans!! I've never used dry beans before but have a yummy recipe for black beans. It calls for cans of black beans and I've decided I want to make them with dried beans (reduce price and sodium…and use my food storage!!). So I've soaked my beans overnight. I now have to cook according to the package? If I want to use the beans like I would use cans out of a can, I need to cook them right? Someone told me I didn't need to cook them more then just in my recipe, but my recipe is basically heating them up for like 7 minutes…so thinking I do need to cook per package directions?? Now to store, since I am soaking the enitre package to save time in the future, do I use some of the cooking liquid when I store them in the fridge or freezer? Also, does anyone know right off how many cups are in a can of beans and is it a direct 1 to 1 ratio of soaked/cooked beans to how much is in a can for recipes? Told you I had lots of bean questions!! πŸ˜‰

  • Samantha

    June 9, 2010 at 10:07 pm

    You can process your own beans in a pressure canner. 2 pounds (2 bags dry) will do 7 pints. I just follow the instructions in “The Ball Blue Book”

Comments are closed.

X